Dallas

Dallas, the county seat of the Dallas County, is the second-largest city in the state of Texas. It is also the fourth-largest metropolitan city in the United States and has been designated as the gamma world city by the Loughborough University Globalization and World Cities Study Group & Network. Dallas was established in the year 1841 but was incorporated as a city in 1856. It is one of the main economic centers in the nation and its prominence comes primarily from its position along several railroad lines, its historical importance as a center for cotton and oil industries, and its influential financial and industrial tycoons.

Dallas, nestled at a maximum elevation of 550 feet (168 m), is also known for its natural beauty. A major attraction in the city is the Austin Chalk Formation, a limestone escarpment, the western edge of which runs north-south through the Dallas County. This 200-foot (61-m) structure is exceptionally visible in the adjacent cities of Cedar Hill, Cockrell Hill, Irving, and Grand Prairie, as well as in the neighborhood of Oak Cliff. The spectacular Trinity River is the major waterway in the city. Another significant water feature in the city is the White Rock Lake. This lake and the beautiful park nearby are a popular tourist destination in Dallas. The main recreational activities in the park include rowing, jogging, and biking.

Other places of tourist interest in the city include the 66-acre (0.27 square km) Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden on the eastern shore of the White Rock Lake; the Bachman Lake to the northwest of Love Field; 22,745-acre (92.12 square km) Lake Ray Hubbard; the Mountain Creek Lake; and the North lake. The Mountain Creek Lake, situated along the border of Dallas, is home to the Naval Air Station Dallas, popularly known as the Hensley Field. Most of the noteworthy architecture in Dallas is either modernist or post-modernist. The most important buildings in the city with modernist architecture include the Bank of American Plaza, IM Pei’s Fountain Place, Reunion Tower, and the Renaissance Tower. Buildings that exemplify the postmodernist architecture are Comerica Bank Tower and the JP Morgan Chase Tower. Other structures like the Kirby Building and Davis & Wilson Buildings are built in the Gothic Revival and Neoclassical styles respectively.

The well-frequented neighborhoods in Downtown Dallas include the Arts District, the West End Historic District, Farmer’s Market District, the Reunion District, Victory Park, the city Center Business District, and the Main Street District. Oak Lawn, which features numerous parks along Turtle Creek, is located to the north of Downtown. East Dallas, on the other hand, is home to the famous Deep Ellum, the historic Vickery Place, Bryan Place, homey Lakewood, and historically significant homes on the Swiss Avenue. North Dallas is a shopping paradise, with opportunities of high-powered shopping at the North Park Center, Galleria Dallas, and Preston Center. The major tourist attractions in South Dallas include Oak Cliff, the Bishop Arts District, the Cedars, Fair Park, and the Pleasant Grove. The main festivals and cultural events organized in the city include the State Fair of Texas held at Fair Park every year; the Red River Shootout game at the Cotton Bowl; Cinco de Mayo festivities; Saint Patrick’s Day parades; the Greek Food Festival of Dallas, and the annual Halloween parade on the Cedar Springs Road.